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Tuesday, June 27, 2017

Garden Composter

Posted by admin on Announcement

I didn’t plan to become a Garden Composter. It just, sort of, happened.

Here’s how:

A little over a year ago, we purchased an acre of land in the country, then built a house on our property. We moved into our new home in December. This past summer, we spent many hours preparing our land for the lawn. This was a process that included removing rocks, pulling weeds, burying irrigation lines, and smoothing the soil.

The rocks are piled in a corner of our lot that is temporarily unused. That is the area where I will put in my shop at some later date.

The weeds we pulled went into our 6×10 flatbed trailer and were hauled to the compost area at the county landfill. Our climate is conducive to growing very large tumbleweeds, very quickly. I think we made about 4 trips with full loads of yard waste totaling about 2 1/2 tons of material.

After many, many evenings and weekends laboring in our yard, we finally planted our lawn seed. Now, we are watering it and watching for it to sprout. Oh, how we look forward to seeing green around our house.

I set aside an area about 30′ by 60′ to put in a vegetable garden. There is nothing better than fresh vegetables in the summer. The satisfaction of having grown them yourself greatly enhances the pleasure of eating all those luscious legumes.

So, next summer, we will have an abundance of lawn clippings and garden waste material. That means more trips to the landfill? Heck no! I’m going to become a Garden Composter. I’m going to recycle all that waste material and use it to make my vegetables grow even better.

I’ve begun the research and the study required to gain the knowledge necessary to recycle as much of our kitchen, lawn and garden waste material into valuable compost that I can use to enhance my garden.

A valuable guide to creating the best compost is “The World’s Best Compost – The How & Why”. This guide, not only describes how to create the best compost, but it also explains the science behind it in layman’s terms.

This book is a “must have” for anyone who is serious about being a Garden Composter.

If you’re like me, and you just want to take the lazy approach to disposing of yard waste, just throw it all in a pile and let it rot.

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Small Garden Composters Start With a Beehive Compost Bin

Posted by admin on June 11, 2011

If you are new to garden composting and have little space for a Garden Composter you may be concerned with what impact the garden compost bin will have on the garden. I would recommend new home composters with small gardens to start with a beehive compost bin if possible. It is true that in many gardens the home made compost pile is often a rather untidy affair, and the purchased garden compost bin is often not a beautiful option either, all brown or green plastic. In many situations this is fine, and indeed appropriate. But in smaller gardens particularly, where things cannot be hidden and every garden fixture and fitting has an impact on the whole, it is nice to achieve the garden recycling dream of home composting without detracting from the beauty of the garden. A wooden beehive compost bin will provide you with an effective garden composter while improving the beauty of your outside space.

It makes sense, in a small garden to have a relatively small garden compost bin. But it must still be practical. The compost bin must be large enough for you to take at least three to six months to fill. Then you should leave it alone for three to six months to decompose. During that time you need another compost bin to fill. If you only have one compost bin, you will need to take out the decomposed contents from the bottom of the bin regularly, while still continually adding to the top of the bin. This is possible but far from ideal. Two garden compost bins, or a dual chamber compost bin, is best. But I admit once you get the home composting bug, you well want more. Indeed we have four at present but in the future, who knows!

My first foray into the world of home composting was with a municipally sponsored, 200 litre capacity, plastic compost bin. I have to say it worked really well. The plastic stops the compost drying out and keeps things warm. The garden compost we got from our plastic bin was fine and crumbly and really gave me the garden composting bug. But that big plastic compost bin didn’t look that great in the small urban garden we then had.

Local councils often sponsor compost bins and water barrels. Check with yours. That was how we got our first water barrel and plastic compost bin. It made both very cheap indeed.

The ugliness of those plastic compost bins is a turn-off for some though. Indeed I have friends with small gardens who just would not have one in the garden to spoil the view. Even though they like to be ‘green’ and ‘eco’ in other ways they couldn’t bring themselves to recycle kitchen waste and recycle garden waste via such an eyesore! Daft I suppose, but true and far from rare thoughts, I imagine. Lets face it, as much as many of us like to lessen our impact on the earth we still have certain wants and needs. And, if yours is keeping the garden pretty and/or plastic free, the plastic compost bin and water barrel combo is not for you!

This is why I am such a fan of the wooden beehive composter. They are beautiful. Indeed I would love one, even though it would be totally impractical as we compost vast quantities of organic matter. They are just so attractive!

I think being able to buy a beautiful product is a great thing. If you aren’t one of life’s natural garden composters, happy with bins made of pallets, plastic and chicken wire, a touch of glamour may well motivate you. I can’t see any reason why you wouldn’t want to visit and regularly top up such a pretty garden compost bin! Surprisingly they aren’t as expensive as I assumed they’d be either, and really do make a feature out of whatever spot in the garden they appear in.

I would always advise having as large a compost bin as possible and indeed composting as much garden, kitchen and animal waste as practical. I am the proud owner of a dry compost loo, so I know whereof I speak. But, for small gardens and just those new to home composting, I think getting a pretty compost bin is a great idea.

So many people think making garden compost is dirty, or difficult, or hard work, that for them, building an array of compost boxes is never going to be even a thought. But for anyone who starts home composting even just a few kitchen scraps and lawn clippings in a relatively small prebuilt compost bin, it is still a reduction in commercial composts sold, peat bog destroyed and landfill filled.

Thus, even though I will never have one, I thoroughly see the point of the beautiful, rustic wooden beehive compost bins and still lust after them in my girlier gardening moments. But for me the whole point of garden composting is to make as much hummus as possible so they would never be practical here.

I think they would make a great gift for someone (with a pretty garden) who is yet to be converted to the merits of composting garden waste or kitchen scraps too. For those people will see ‘what is compost?’ quickly and through the rose tinted spectacles of someone with a particularly beautiful compost bin!

Sealed garden compost bins are great for composting without worrying about vermin or indeed children getting their hands on the kitchen waste. In wet climates your sealed bins mean you don’t get the whole heap too wet (which would stop the microbes being able to function). They also prevent all the goodness leaching away. Sealed compost bins are equally fabulous in hot climates where the heap could dry out (microbes do need moist conditions just not saturated ones).

If I was just starting out garden composting or looking for a small garden composter, I would definitely look into the wooden beehive compost bin option. Whether to improve the look of a small garden or because you are only composting kitchen waste on a small scale, they work well and look great.

I have lots more articles on gardening. Please check out my page and go to my blog from there!

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Pet Poo Composter – The Tumbleweed

Posted by admin on October 21, 2010

Tumbleweed Pet Poo Poop Composter ConverterHow does the Tumbleweed Pet Poop composter convertor work?

The Tumbleweed Pet Poo Converter consists of two sturdy nesting boxes with a lid, which form a neat, compact portable unit. The worms eat and breed in the top box.

The top box has a perforated base to allow any liquid waste to drain through to the bottom (collector) box. The “worm poo” or worm castings remain in the top box and can be harvested as desired. The bottom or catcher box collects the valuable liquid waste which can be diluted and used as a fertilizer on your (ornamental flower) garden.

There is no difficulty in getting the worms to eat dog droppings. Commercial worm farmers rear their worms on manure.

Please note, however, that it is not possible to mix diets. They must be fed exclusively on pet poo.

If you want to recycle vegetable scraps you must set up a separate farm.

Specifications:

# Constructed of UV treated High Impact Polypropylene Hardened Plastic

# Dimensions: Length 23″ x Width 15″ x Height 10″

# Weight 10 pounds

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Garden Composter

Posted by admin on October 1, 2010

Garden ComposterBlack gold. Oil? Naw, new soil. Garden Composter turns garden waste into rich, organic fertilizer. SAVE BIG! Jumbo size! Holds approx. 11 cu. ft. Green Thumb alert! Here’s the ticket for your plants to be real “gushers”… healthy, lush and productive! Create your own fertile gardening soil by recycling yard greenery such as lawn clippings, leaves, weeds and natural kitchen waste into rich compost. It’s what gardeners call “black gold.” Composting is environmentally friendly. And it greatly reduces “trash” that’s normally sent to your local landfill. Right now, you can cultivate BIG bucks in savings, due to our volume buy! Details: 100% recycled plastic holds approx. 11 cubic feet; Easy access lid opens from either side (closes tight to lock out critters); Adjustable air vents; Slide bottom door for easy compost access; Compact footprint allows for placement in tight spots; Works best in a sunny location; Easy, snap-together assembly; 23 x 23 x 40 1/4″h., weighs 28 lbs. Recycle greenery the easy way. Act now! Garden Composter

Price: $100.00

Click here to buy from Amazon

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The Best Small Composters For Small Gardens

Posted by admin on

When gardening in a small backyard it is crucial that all the components be perfect, or as near to perfect as we can manage. With space at a premium we need to choose the best small garden composter suited to our needs. After reviewing both conventional small compost bins and backyard tumblers here are my top three garden compost bins for small gardens.

All of my top three compost bins for small spaces will give you great garden compost. All are ventilated, vermin proof and made of dark plastic. This gives all three the ability to produce fast, hot compost from your garden waste and kitchen scraps. Plus all should prove durable enough to last through the years of composting to come.

Your budget and just how small your small backyard is, will of course determine which is more suited to your needs. But all the top three small garden composters are a good place to start before making your decision.

The Envirocycle Compost Tumbler

This is a great little backyard tumbler. It comes in a choice of colours. In a small space black appears further away so that is the one I would choose. Also being black has the advantage of increasing the heat inside the drum, so helping to make your garden compost faster.

This is an ideal backyard tumbler for small gardens because it sits low to the ground so having much less impact in a small space. Because the design is low to the ground there also is less of an issue if you have a less than perfect place to site the bin. Whilst those on high metal frames will have to be placed somewhere completely level and out of the way to prevent knocks, this one isn’t going to go anywhere even if it does get the odd knock from running children or pets.

Being a relatively small drum which spins on its short axis, this is one compost tumbler which remains easy to spin no matter how full it gets. All that spinning means you never need to turn or mix the composting material in any other way.

One of the things I particularly like is that it comes with a decent warranty. Some of the more expensive tumbling compost bins come with far shorter guarantees which makes me worry about there more complicated designs. The Envirocycle compost tumbler has a manufacturer’s warranty of 5 years for the drum, 2 years for the base.

Another feature is that the material is 50% post consumer, recycled plastic which means buying the Envirocycle helps the environment that little bit.

Although creating compost in 4 to 6 weeks is extremely quick, I would emphasise that ideally (space permitting) you would need two of these bins to provide a year round home to all your organic waste.

The SoilSaver Compost Bin

This is as basic as manufactured garden compost bins tend to get. This is cheap but it is also durable, simple to install, and square which means it is even more suited to small spaces. Being a static bin, means this composter will not usually produce garden compost quite so quickly as the Envirocycle. But, it is well insulated and black so it will still produce quality compost within a few months.

The only point which needs ot be remembered about the SoilSaver compost bin is that it will only work correctly if sited on level ground. This is because it is square with sliding sides (making removing compost easy) and a locking lid (to keep out vermin). If you do not place this on level ground the corners will be under stress and the lid is unlikely to remain tightly fitted.

This is simple to put together and made from 75% post consumer, recycled plastic. So even though the name isn’t as ‘green’, this is actually the most environmentally friendly garden composter of the three.

This small composter is very cheap but strong and sturdy. So much so that it comes with a 25 year warranty, proving the faith the manufacturers have in their product. Again, space permitting you really would need two of these garden composters to ensure year round collection of your organic waste.

The Earthmaker Garden Composter

This looks like the ideal garden composter for a small garden because you should never need any additional compost bins. This system incorporates three bins into one. You add new organic waste to the top. Then once a month use a tool to slide the chamber base so that decomposing materials fall down into the lower chambers.

Once the system is set up, and you’ve been using it a while you should have a non-stop supply of finished garden compost in the bottom. At the same time you should also always have a space at the top in which to deposit more garden waste and kitchen scraps.

This is significantly more pricey than the two options above but if space is your paramount problem, it could provide an answer to your composting needs. This is a very efficient, hot, method of producing compost. Once established your waste should become garden compost within a month. The makers suggest you’ll be creating 10 gallons of compost every 4 weeks but obviously that depends very much on how much waste you have to put in it.

It is disappointing that there is no information available regarding any extended warranty either on amazon or other (more expensive) stockists. Though as it is made from sturdy plastic, without any complicated metal framework or wheels it at least looks very durable.

This continuous composting system is the one I would choose if I really could not accommodate two composters into my garden. However if your small garden isn’t quite that small I suggest the Envirocycle compost tumbler for easy use or the Soilsaver for no-nonsense, long lasting garden composting.

I have lots more articles on gardening. Please check out my page and go to my blog from there!

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90 Gallon Composter

Posted by admin on September 29, 2010

90 Gallon ComposterThis composter not only blends in discreetly with your landscape, its dark color absorbs more of the suns heat, creating optimal conditions for efficient composting. Convenient, open-bottom design eliminates dumping” just use one of the four removable side doors as a scoop to distribute. Made of lightweight, 100% recycled plastic, its easy to move and simple to assemble. Size: 30″ sq. x 34-1/4″H. Found in Lawn & Garden , Garden Tools & Supplies , Yard Care , More Yard Care Tools

Price:

Click here to buy from Amazon

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Garden Composter – What is Garden Compost?

Posted by admin on September 26, 2010

Put simply, compost is decomposed organic matter. So those leaves breaking down on the forest floor are compost, as too are the bodies at the cemetery. All organic matter lives, then dies and breaks down into different qualities of compost. That breakdown of organic matter is carried out by animals, plants, moulds, microbes, air and water, basically ‘nature’ or ‘mother earth’ depending on how whimsical you feel.

That was the easy answer, but the long answer is dependent on what kind of gardener you are. Do you make your own garden compost, and if so how? Or do you just buy it in bags from the store? Every gardener who is a fan of garden composting has a slightly different method. They will use slightly different ingredients in their garden composters. So everyone’s garden compost is a bit different!

Garden soil tends to be a combination of crushed rock and mineral mixed up with hummus (the end result of your garden compost bin). Compost is the bulk within the soil but not necessarily the nutrient provider. Hummus improves the soil structure, allowing it to hold moisture and air.

The more hummus the soil has the better the structure. The soil will not be compacted, as some clay soils are apt to do. Hummus opens them out leaving air pockets which are so vital for the micro-organisms and insect life so vital to the health and vitality of the soil and eventually your plants.

Hummus is spongy and great at holding water so is vital for those with sandy soils. But, any soil will be improved by the addition of more hummus. Home compost is free and easy to create. There is no reason not to compost waste from the home and garden. Much easier to trapse to the bottom of the garden with garden waste or kitchen scraps to compost, than sort them out and place in bins for a destiny in municipal landfill.

Brilliantly, many local authorities across Europe and the US are recycling organic waste on a commercial scale. But if you have space for even the smallest beehive compost bin it makes sense to keep your garden waste for yourself and make your own garden compost. Your compost will be a very locally sourced product and free to boot!

Compost or hummus provides the soil with slow release nutrients. The variety of nutrients will depend entirely on what the compost originally was. For example composting a nitrogen rich poultry manure, will give a nitrogen rich compost.

The very best garden composts are made from a wide variety of ingredients so the resulting hummus is full of the widest variety of nutrients. The hummus which is the end product of the garden composter should be spongy in texture and full of all the trace elements needed in the garden.

So when you are making compost at home the very best approach is to put as many different things in your garden compost bin, as possible. That way you will get the widest variety of goodness to put on your garden.

It is worth telling friends and neighbours if you are starting garden composting. That way you can get more ‘food’ for the compost bin from them. Composting is the ultimate in garden recycling. And, the more you can recycle to the composter the better the compost will be.

The biggest problem most people face is not being able to fill the garden compost bin fast enough. The whole point of garden compositng, is to improve on what nature does all day every day. The earth tends to compost slowly. Moulds, bacteria, insects, scavengers all slowly turning what was once alive, into hummus to feed the next generation. If you leave a pile of dead leaves in the corner of your garden, eventually nature will break them down. But since they’re dry and exposed to the elements, along with being one solitary type of matter, the process will be very slow. Indeed you may find they’ve all blown away before you get a decent leaf mulch!

Garden composting means helping nature out. Gathering all the dead matter you want to recycle into garden compost, and then protecting it from the elements will speed up the process no end. Also using as wide variety of ingredients for your compost bins will introduce lots of different organisms that work together to make your compost useful in no time.

When carried out successfully garden compost is a beautiful, nutty product that improves the fertility and productivity of your garden. To the successful gardener, composting is a way to save money, work with the environment, recycle and reduce waste. Perhaps most importantly it is a way of ensuring the garden remains productive over the long term. If we are forever harvesting crops we literally reduce the soil bulk and soil vitality of our garden. You can see this in practice as over the years the actual level of soil on a vegetable plot will sink. Maybe more importantly crop yields and performance will falter unless something is done.

Although garden compost is not particularly rich (say in comparison with an organic fertilizer) in nutrients immediately available to plants, it is a feeder as well as bulker for the soil. The nutrients locked up in the compost will be ‘slow release’ nutrients which means putting composted matter on the garden, means feeding in the long term. This will promote tough plants which are fully developed and strong, not the sappy growth susceptible to disease which quick release fertilizers can give.

The soil life; microbes, bacteria, worms and so on will pull down the compost into the soil where it can do even more good. Best of all you don’t have to dig it in!

See I said the answer to ‘What is Compost?’ was a long one! for some people compost is a sad pile of leaves and grass clippings, fermenting in the corner of the garden. But, for the successful gardener, compost is a useful, spongy hummus and a great way to recycle all manner of garden and kitchen waste. Make sure the latter is the answer to ‘What is Compost?’ for you by looking after your garden composter!

I have lots more articles on gardening. Please check out my page and go to my blog from there!

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Siting a Garden Composter

Posted by admin on September 25, 2010

Perhaps more important than what type of garden composter you choose is where you actually put your garden compost bin. You need it to be somewhere that is beneficial to both the process of making garden compost AND, most importantly, to you.

What to Put Your Garden Composter On?

The key point is that any compost bin should be placed on the ground ideally on bare soil. Your garden soil holds all the micro organisms that will be needed to turn your garden waste into organic compost. The easiest way to ensure they make their way into your heap of organic matter is by letting it touch the soil. If you can face it, clear the ground of weeds or grass before placing your compost bin. If you don’t you may find weeds flourishing inside your bin during the initial stages of filling. Don’t worry though they’ll soon be smothered by the compost heap so this is not a critical job.

Placing the compost heap on bare soil means that as it cools, and decomposition slows, the worms can find their way in. Never put worms on your compost heap yourself. If the heap is too hot they will perish and then you have taken away a garden friend from your soil, with no benefit to the compost bin at all. Worms will find their own way in when the time is right.

If you do not have any bare ground on which to place your garden composter you can of course put it onto concrete or slabs. This will slow things down a little so either use a compost activator or throw a few spades full of soil into the bin at the start. Again do not add worms to the compost bin. Even sited on concrete those worms will miraculously make their way there when the time is right.

Do not site your garden composter on wooden decking unless you really do not mind it becoming damp, stained and likely to eventually rot.

Where to Place the Garden Compost Bin?

Obviously your garden is unique to you and so I cannot tell you where your garden composter should be located. But, there are a few things to keep in mind.

* Will the Garden Composter be an eyesore?

* Will the Garden Compost Bin be easy to use – both for filling and emptying?

* Will the Compost Bin be attractive to children or pets?

* What about fruit flies and gnats?

The initial choice is often to locate a garden compost bin as far away as possible from the house. That way you don’t see it (they’re often not the prettiest things to look at). But, are you the kind of person who is keen on traipsing through a muddy field with a bowl of kitchen scraps? If you are all well and good. If however you are likely to lapse in your composting duties if the bin seems too far away, put it somewhere closer to the house. A basic wooden fence blocking your compost bin from view can be an ideal place for some pretty climbers so that even the ugliest bin becomes a garden feature.

Whether you chose to compost all your organic household waste or just your vegetable peelings, make sure you get yourself some way of storing that waste indoors. A plastic bucket with a lid, under the sink makes a convenient holding ground for household organic waste which you haven’t got the time or inclination to dump in the compost bin just yet. There are even crocks designed specifically to hold kitchen scraps. These make composting kitchen waste a lot more attractive and many come with carbon filters which ensure no nasty smells surround the Kitchen Countertop Composter no matter how rarely you make it down to the end of the garden to empty.

In warm climates fruit flies and gnats can be a nuisance, attracted by the moisture and food in a compost bin. If you always try to cover any new kitchen scraps with garden waste such as grass clippings it will help. But, when you lift the lid of your garden compost bin the chances are you will get a face full of gnats during the summer months. If this is a concern to you make sure your compost bin is away from kitchen windows and doors to discourage any insects you disturb heading for the inside of your home.

Though you need that compost bin to be handy to fill, don’t forget about emptying it. If you are likely to want to turn your compost heap make sure there is plenty of room near it, to make the job easy. If all your composted material will be headed for a particular area of the garden, such as the vegetable patch, site your bin there.

Any compost bin which is working well because it is full of variety should not be particularly smelly to you and I. Some animals however have a much more advanced sense of smell, so are likely to be interested in your garden compost bins. I have lived with various dogs and cats, some of whom completely ignore the compost heap and others fixate on that mysterious bin continually. Most garden compost bins you can buy are pet proof. But if you have a particularly robust dog with a compost fixation think about siting it somewhere the dog does not have access to. Open compost bins, such as those homemade from pallets or other wood scraps, should be secured to prevent your pets gaining access. Chicken wire is cheap and easy to fix around the base, while the lid should be too heavy or even better hinged and clasped to prevent any pets getting in.

The main thing is to ensure your compost bin is not a ‘hassle’. Make it easy to use and you will use it more. The more you use it, the more goodness will be returned to your garden and the less waste you will send to landfill.

All to often, a poorly situated garden composter can become a neglected, expensive entity, ignored and forgotten. Composting your kitchen scraps and garden waste is a great thing to do, so do not give yourself any excuses not to continue doing it!

I have lots more articles on gardening. Please check out my page and go to my blog from there!

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Small Garden Composters Start With a Beehive Compost Bin

Posted by admin on September 22, 2010

If you are a new to garden composting and have little space for a Garden Composter you may be concerned with how the garden compost bin will impact on the garden. I would recommend new home composters with small gardens to start with a beehive compost bin if possible. It is true that in many gardens the home made compost pile is often a rather untidy affair, and the bought garden compost bin is often not a beautiful option either, all brown or green plastic. In many situations this is fine, and indeed appropriate. But in smaller gardens particularly, where things cannot be hidden and every garden fixture and fitting has an impact on the whole, it is nice to achieve the garden recycling dream of home composting without detracting from the beauty of the garden. A wooden beehive compost bin will provide you with an effective garden composter while improving the beauty of your outside space.

It makes sense, in a small garden to have a relatively small garden compost bin. But it must still be practical. The compost bin must be large enough for you to take at least three to six months to fill. Then you leave for three to six months to decompose. During that time you need another compost bin to fill. If you only have one compost bin, you will need to take out the decomposed contents from the bottom of the bin regularly, while still continually adding to the top of the bin. This is possible but far from ideal. Two garden compost bins, or a dual chamber compost bin, is best. But I admit once you get the home composting bug, you well want more. Indeed we have four at present but in the future, who knows!

My first foray into the world of home composting was with a municipally sponsored, 200 litre capacity, plastic compost bin. I have to say it worked really well. The plastic stops the compost drying out and keeps things warm. The garden compost we got from our plastic bin was fine and crumbly and really gave me the garden composting bug. But that big plastic compost bin didn’t look that great in the small urban garden we then had.

Local councils often sponsor compost bins and water barrels. Check with yours. That was how we got our first water barrel and plastic compost bin. It made both very cheap indeed.

The ugliness of those plastic compost bins is a turn-off for some though. Indeed I have friends with small gardens who just would not have one in the garden to spoil the view. Even though they like to be ‘green’ and ‘eco’ in other ways they couldn’t bring themselves to recycle kitchen waste and recycle garden waste via such an eyesore! Daft I suppose, but true and far from rare thoughts, I imagine. Lets face it, as much as many of us like to lessen our impact on the earth we still have certain wants and needs. And, if yours is keeping the garden pretty and/or plastic free, the plastic compost bin and water barrel combo is not for you!

This is why I am such a fan of the wooden beehive composter. They are beautiful. Indeed I would love one, even though it would be totally impractical as we compost vast quantities of organic matter. They are just so attractive!

I think being able to buy a beautiful product is a great thing. If you aren’t one of life’s natural garden composters, happy with bins made of pallets, plastic and chicken wire, a touch of glamour may well motivate you. I can’t see any reason why you wouldn’t want to visit and regularly top up such a pretty garden compost bin! Surprisingly they aren’t as expensive as I assumed they’d be either, and really do make a feature out of whatever spot in the garden they appear in.

I would always advise having as large a compost bin as possible and indeed composting as much garden, kitchen and animal waste as practical. I am the proud owner of a dry compost loo, so I know whereof I speak. But, for small gardens and just those new to home composting, I think getting a pretty compost bin is a great idea.

So many people think making garden compost is dirty, or difficult, or hard work, that for them, building an array of compost boxes is never going to be even a thought. But for anyone who starts home composting even just a few kitchen scraps and lawn clippings in a relatively small prebuilt compost bin, it is still a reduction in commercial composts sold, peat bog destroyed and landfill filled.

Thus, even though I will never have one, I thoroughly see the point of the beautiful, rustic wooden beehive compost bins and still lust after them in my girlier gardening moments. But for me the whole point of garden composting is to make as much hummus as possible so they would never be practical here.

I think they would make a great pressie for someone (with a pretty garden) who is yet to be converted to the merits of composting garden waste or kitchen scraps too. For those people will see ‘what is compost?’ quickly and through the rose tinted spectacles of someone with a particularly beautiful compost bin!

Sealed garden compost bins are great for composting without worrying about vermin or indeed children getting their hands on the kitchen waste. In wet climates your sealed bins mean you don’t get the whole heap too wet (which would stop the microbes being able to function). They also prevent all the goodness leaching away. Sealed compost bins are equally fab in hot climates where the heap could dry out (microbes do need moist conditions just not saturated ones).

If I was just starting out garden composting or a looking for a small garden composter, I would definitely look into the wooden beehive compost bin option. Whether to improve the look of a small garden or because you are only composting kitchen waste on a small scale, they work well and look great.

I have lots more articles on gardening. Please check out my page and go to my blog from there!

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Compost Bin Composting: A How To

Posted by admin on September 21, 2010

The nature of gardening is such that the best care should be given to pot plants or garden plants. Growing a garden and taking care of vegetation is somehow like raising your own child; the right attention, love and care ought to be present for healthy growth. Compost bin composting allows the gardening enthusiasts to do just that: love and care for you garden and compost.

Compost bin composting is when you use a bin to make your compost out of either manure or scraps. This is very unlike the conventional method that entailed digging a deep hole in the ground and filling it up with dead and live plant matter. And much cleaner; and I guess, can make your garden or lawn look that much more decorative and pleasing.

What you do is take compost bin and set it outside in the sun. The holes in the side of the compost bin are for oxygen to circulate freely since the microorganisms that breakdown plant matter need it to survive. Another reason is for water to trickle out slowly enough to promote decay.

After having done this you can begin filling the compost bin with dead and live plant matter in equal proportions. Anything like mowed grass; leaves from tree branches and even twigs. Put a lid over it and leave the manure in the sun and wait for decomposition to start.

Every once in a while you should turn the compost around so that it remains aerated and oxygenated. When there is inadequate moisture- perhaps a rain barrel could be in your future as well – fill it with water some more. After a month your compost should be ready for harvesting.

If you’re using a compost bin that is not made of plastic, make sure it is hoisted on a wooden stand so that it does not rust.

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